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TRIO Upward Bound

Summary
The students planned to better educate elementary students on watersheds and their importance within our communities. The community needs to be aware of why healthy watersheds are important in order to be better informed about how we, as people, affect the quality of watersheds and how watershed health affects us.

The students created and developed watershed educational materials – bookmarks, handouts, and postcards – for third graders to provide quick information about stormwater and watersheds. These materials were created in both English and Spanish. The students presented at Cesar Chavez Elementary School to a third grade classroom and distributed their educational materials to the class. They educated the students on what a watershed is and where their local watershed can be found.

Fostering Lifelong Stewardship
This project helped encourage the students to do environmental projects that helped get students involved in civic and community engagement in hopes of making young Michigan residents more aware of their local, natural environment and creating lifelong advocates for the Great Lakes. For the students leading this project, they are now knowledgeable to develop and execute a project to further their knowledge and educate others on watersheds and provide information to others on how to help protect the watersheds in our community, rather than simply providing volunteer hours.

Number of Students
6

Number of Teachers
2

Partners
City of Grand Rapids Environmental Services Department
Cesar Chavez Elementary School

Funders
Baldwin Foundation

Tags
Watershed education, community engagement, Spanish-language materials

Summary
TRIO Upward Bound students at Central and Union High Schools have continued maintaining a native plant garden at Cook Arts Center by weeding the garden at the start of spring. Students have consistently assessed the garden to see what plants have came back after the winter and fall months and have added new native plants during this school year. Students have studied the local watershed and runoff and have developed a better understanding of how native plants reduce runoff, their planting of native plants tied into the project theme of how native plants help reduce runoff. Water samples have been compared at urban and rural sites.

The theme of the project is “How native plants can help with runoff in an urban environment.” We focus on how a watersheds in Grand Rapids directly affect the students and how the students can make an impact to help prevent runoff from happening.

Showcase Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxlA5rCLylA

Number of Students
65

Number of Teachers
2

Partners
WMEAC
Cook Arts Center

Funders
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Tags
native revegetation, community garden, stormwater, runoff, art

District
GRPS

School Website
https://www.gvsu.edu/ub/

View Project Photos